International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
Co-Editors-in-Chief
Dongming Guo
2020
Volume: 2 Issue 1
9 Article(s)
Zhang Dongshi, Ranjan Bikas, Tanaka Takuo, and Sugioka Koji

In this study, we demonstrate a technique termed underwater persistent bubble assisted femtosecond laser ablation in liquids (UPB-fs-LAL) that can greatly expand the boundaries of surface micro/ nanostructuring through laser ablation because of its capability to create concentric circular macrostructures with millimeter-scale tails on silicon substrates. Long-tailed macrostructures are composed of layered fan-shaped (central angles of 45°–141°) hierarchical micro/nanostructures, which are produced by fan-shaped beams refracted at the mobile bubble interface (?50° light tilt, referred to as the vertical incident direction) during UPB-fs-LAL line-by-line scanning. Marangoni flow generated during UPB-fs-LAL induces bubble movements. Fast scanning (e.g. 1mms-1) allows a long bubble movement (as long as 2mm), while slow scanning (e.g. 0.1mms?1) prevents bubble movements. When persistent bubbles grow considerably (e.g. hundreds of microns in diameter) due to incubation effects, they become sticky and can cause both gas-phase and liquidphase laser ablation in the central and peripheral regions of the persistent bubbles. This generates low/high/ultrahigh spatial frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures (LSFLs/HSFLs/ UHSFLs) with periods of 550–900, 100–200, 40–100 nm, which produce complex hierarchical surface structures. A period of 40 nm, less than 1/25th of the laser wavelength (1030 nm), is the finest laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) ever created on silicon. The NIR-MIR reflectance/transmittance of fan-shaped hierarchical structures obtained by UPB-fs-LAL at a small line interval (5 μm versus 10 μm) is extremely low, due to both their extremely high light trapping capacity and absorbance characteristics, which are results of the structures’ additional layers and much finer HSFLs. In the absence of persistent bubbles, only grooves covered with HSFLs with periods larger than 100 nm are produced, illustrating the unique attenuation abilities of laser properties (e.g. repetition rate, energy, incident angle, etc) by persistent bubbles with different curvatures. This research represents a straightforward and cost-effective approach to diversifying the achievable hierarchical micro/nanostructures for a multitude of applications.

International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 15001 (2020)
  • Ohmori Hitoshi, Umezu Shinjiro, Kim Yunji, Uehara Yoshihiro, Kasuga Hiroshi, Kato Teruko, Itoh Nobuhide, Kurokawa Syuhei, Kusumi Takayuki, Sugawara Yugo, and Kunimura Shinsuke

    Total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis is applied to trace element detection in liquid for effective environmental monitoring. This analytical approach requires x-ray total reflection mirrors. In order to achieve high sensitivity element detection, the mirrors require high surface quality for high x-ray reflectivity. Surface finishing for x-ray mirrors is typically conducted through a series of abrasive processes, such as grinding and polishing, and is thus time consuming. The purpose of this study is to streamline and enhance the surface finishing process based on unique high quality grinding techniques for the production of x-ray total reflection mirrors.

    International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
    Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 15101 (2020)
  • Mathew Paven Thomas, and Fang Fengzhou

    Atomic scale manufacturing is a necessity of the future to develop atomic scale devices with high precision. A different perspective of the quantum realm, which includes the tunnelling effect, leakage current at the atomic-scale, Coulomb blockade and Kondo effect, is inevitable for the fabrication and hence, the mass production of these devices. For these atomic-scale device development, molecular level devices must be fabricated. Proper theoretical studies could be an aid towards the experimental realities. Electronic transport studies are the basis to realise and interpret the problems happening at this minute scale. Keeping these in mind, we present a periodic energy decomposition analysis (pEDA) of two potential candidates for moletronics: phthalocyanines and porphyrins, by placing them over gold substrate cleaved at the (111) plane to study the adsorption and interaction at the interface and then, to study their application as a channel between two electrodes, thereby, providing a link between pEDA and electronic transport studies. pEDA provides information regarding the bond strength and the contribution of electrostatic energy, Pauli’s energy, orbital energy and the orbital interactions. Combining this analysis with electronic transport studies can provide novel directions for atomic/close-toatomic- scale manufacturing (ACSM). Literature survey shows that this is the first work which establishes a link between pEDA and electronic transport studies and a detailed pEDA study on the above stated molecules. The results show that among the molecules studied, porphyrins are more adsorbable over gold substrate and conducting across a molecular junction than phthalocyanines, even though both molecules show a similarity in adsorption and conduction when a terminal thiol linker is attached. A further observation establishes the importance of attractive terms, which includes interaction, orbital and electrostatic energies, in correlating the pEDA study with the transport properties. By progressing this research, further developments could be possible in atomic-scale manufacturing in the future.

    International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
    Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 15401 (2020)
  • Jiang Guo, Jianguo Zhang, Yanan Pan, Renke Kang, Yoshiharu Namba, Paul Shore, Xiaobin Yue, Baorui Wang, and Dongming Guo

    Diamond tools play a critical role in ultra-precision machining due to their excellent physical and mechanical material properties, such as that cutting edge can be sharpened to nanoscale accuracy. However, abrasive chemical reactions between diamond and non-diamond-machinable metal elements, including Fe, Cr, Ti, Ni, etc, can cause excessive tool wear in diamond cutting of such metals and most of their alloys. This paper reviews the latest achievements in the chemical wear and wear suppression methods for diamond tools in cutting of ferrous metals. The focus will be on the wear mechanism of diamond tools, and the typical wear reduction methods for diamond cutting of ferrous metals, including ultrasonic vibration cutting, cryogenic cutting, surface nitridation and plasma assisted cutting, etc. Relevant commercially available devices are introduced as well. Furthermore, future research trends in diamond tool wear suppression are discussed and examined.

    International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
    Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 12001 (2020)
  • Silvain Jean-Fran ois, Heintz Jean-Marc, Veillere Amélie, Constantin Loic, and Lu Yong Feng

    The increase in both power and packing densities in power electronic devices has led to an increase in the market demand for effective heat-dissipating materials with a high thermal conductivity and thermal expansion coefficient compatible with chip materials while still ensuring the reliability of the power modules. Metal matrix composites, especially copper matrix composites, containing carbon fibers, carbon nanofibers, or diamond are considered very promising as the next generation of thermalmanagement materials in power electronic packages. These composites exhibit enhanced thermal properties, as compared to pure copper, combined with lower density. This paper presents powder metallurgy and hot uniaxial pressing fabrication techniques for copper/carbon composite materials which promise to be efficient heat-dissipation materials for power electronic modules. Thermal analyses clearly indicate that interfacial treatments are required in these composites to achieve high thermal and thermomechanical properties. Control of interfaces (through a novel reinforcement surface treatment, the addition of a carbide-forming element inside the copper powders, and processing methods), when selected carefully and processed properly, will form the right chemical/ mechanical bonding between copper and carbon, enhancing all of the desired thermal and thermomechanical properties while minimizing the deleterious effects. This paper outlines a variety of methods and interfacial materials that achieve these goals.

    International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
    Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 12002 (2020)
  • Tino Rance, Leary Martin, Yeo Adam, Kyriakou Elizabeth, Kron Tomas, and Brandt Milan

    The additive manufacturing (AM) process plays an important role in enabling cross-disciplinary research in engineering and personalised medicine. Commercially available clinical tools currently utilised in radiotherapy are typically based on traditional manufacturing processes, often leading to non-conformal geometries, time-consuming manufacturing process and high costs. An emerging application explores the design and development of patient-specific clinical tools using AM to optimise treatment outcomes among cancer patients receiving radiation therapy. In this review, we: 1)? highlight the key advantages of AM in radiotherapy where rapid prototyping allows for patient-specific manufacture 2) explore common clinical workflows involving radiotherapy tools such as bolus, compensators, anthropomorphic phantoms, immobilisers, and brachytherapy moulds; 3) investigate how current AM processes are exploited by researchers to achieve patient tissuelike imaging and dose attenuations. Finally, significant AM research opportunities in this space are highlighted for their future advancements in radiotherapy for diagnostic and clinical research applications.

    International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
    Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 12003 (2020)
  • Hard coatings are extensively required in industry for protecting mechanical/structural parts that withstand extremely high temperature, stress, chemical corrosion, and other hostile environments. Electrical discharge coating (EDC) is an emerging surface modification technology to produce such hard coatings by using electrical discharges to coat a layer of material on workpiece surface to modify and enhance the surface characteristics or create new surface functions. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of EDC technologies for various materials, and summarises the types and key parameters of EDC processes as well as the characteristics of resulting coatings. It provides a systematic summary of the fundamentals and key features of the EDC processes, as well as its applications and future trends.

    International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
    Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 012004 (2020)
  • Zhao Jun, Yang Shumin, Xue Chaofan, Wang Liansheng, Liang Zhaofeng, Zhang Lei, Wang Yong, Wu Yanqing, and Tai Renzhong

    This paper introduces the recent progress in methodologies and their related applications based on the soft x-ray interference lithography beamline in the Shanghai synchrotron radiation facility. Dual-beam, multibeam interference lithography and Talbot lithography have been adopted as basic methods in the beamline. To improve the experimental performance, a precise real-time vibration evaluation system has been established; and the lithography stability has been greatly improved. In order to meet the demands for higher resolution and practical application, novel experimental methods have been developed, such as high-order diffraction interference exposure, high-aspect-ratio and large-area stitching exposure, and parallel direct writing achromatic Talbot lithography. As of now, a 25 nm half-pitch pattern has been obtained; and a cm2 exposure area has been achieved in practical samples. The above methods have been applied to extreme ultraviolet photoresist evaluation, photonic crystal and surface plasmonic effect research, and so on.

    International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
    Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 12005 (2020)
  • Semiconductor and laser single crystals are usually brittle and hard, which need to be ground to have satisfactory surface integrity and dimensional precision prior to their applications. Improvement of the surface integrity of a ground crystal can shorten the time of a subsequent polishing process, thus reducing the manufacturing cost. The development of cost-effective grinding technologies for those crystals requires an in-depth understanding of their deformation and removal mechanisms. As a result, a great deal of research efforts were directed towards studying this topic in the past two or three decades. In this review, we aimed to summarize the deformation and removal characteristics of representative semiconductor and laser single crystals in accordance with the scale of mechanical loading, especially at extremely small scales. Their removal mechanisms were critically examined based on the evidence obtained from highresolution TEM analyses. The relationships between machining conditions and removal behaviors were discussed to provide a guidance for further advancing of the grinding technologies for those crystals.

    International Journal of Extreme Manufacturing
    Mar. 15, 2020
  • Vol. 2 Issue 1 012006 (2020)
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